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Thread: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

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    HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    The following article is a how-to on replacing the radiator on an E500 or 500E. It should also apply equally to the 400E or E420, and generally speaking should also apply to any W124 car, with caveats.

    Part numbers:
    • Radiator (same part for 036 and 034 chassis): 124 500 14 02 - Behr or Nissens are fine. Approximately USD $200 via AutohausAZ.com
    • 2 copper washers for transmission cooler banjo bolts): 007603-012102 - approximately USD $0.25 each via AutohausAZ.com
    • 1 gallon MB or Zerex G05 coolant - approximately $15 per gallon via O'Reilly Auto Parts or $20+ per gallon at the MB stealership (blue fluid)
    • 1 quart Dexron III compatible transmission fluid - approximately $5.00 at any auto parts store


    Tools needed:
    • Medium flat-blade screwdriver
    • 1/4" ratchet with 8mm, 10mm and 13mm sockets
    • 19mm box-end or open-end wrench


    Recently, the day before I left for Europe on June 16th, I was out nd about the north Houston area (I-45 corridor) in my E500, when I noticed that it was running a solid 110C on the freeway, when the speed should have had it at 100C or below. Arousing my suspicion, I downshifted the car at freeway speed into 3rd gear in an attempt to spool up the fan, to see if it would engage and cool things down a bit. It did not. At this point, being about 10-12 miles from home, I went into "emergency" mode and opened the windows and turned the heater on full blast. The temperature of the car continued to climb to the 110-115 mark -- causing me a lot of alarm. The last 5 miles home after getting off the freeway were especially nerve-wracking, because of the stoplights I had to endure. I revved the engine up to 3,000 RPM at each stoplight to keep the coolant circulating and the fan spooled up.

    I got home luckily without overheating the car, but just barely avoided the dreaded 120C mark. I immediately pulled the car into my garage nose-first and popped the hood, and immediately saw the culprit -- the car was blowing steam out the front and rear of the upper driver's side of the radiator, and one could see dried coolant all over the engine compartment. The car was hissing and steam was escaping, and it continued to do this for a good 10 minutes after shutting the car off.

    Finally, after letting the car cool down considerably, I decided to fill the bone-dry coolant overflow tank to see how much coolant had actually leaked/escaped from the cooling system. I only had 5 quarts of pre-mixed 50-50 MB coolant on hand, but the car took this and I was only at the very bottom of the coolant tank, so it probably would have taken at least another 1.5 quarts. So this means I had burned through at least 6.5 out of the car's 12-13 quarts of coolant. Oy!

    Here are some photos of the carnage that I found inside of the engine compartment, once things had cooled down:
    IMG_2759.JPG IMG_2761.JPG IMG_2762.JPG IMG_2763.JPG IMG_2764.JPG IMG_2765.JPG


    Now, I was leaving for GVZ Euro Tour 2013 literally the NEXT DAY, so I had no time to deal with this situation. So, I left the car parked in the garage with the hood up as a reminder to my wife not to drive it while I was gone.

    By a stroke of good fortune, back in February my mechanic mentioned casually to me that he had a spare 500E radiator (a Nissens, new in box) that another customer had ordered a couple of years ago, but never picked up / paid for. So it was sitting around, and he wanted to get rid of it. I offered him $150 for it (AHAZ sells them for $200) and he was glad to oblige. I purchased the unit knowing that my car was still on its original radiator, and thus I got it as an insurance policy for the future. Little did I know that I would be using it in a matter of mere months...

    Anyway, job #1 upon my return has been to get the radiator replaced. I got the spare unit down from my attic where I'd stored it, and the went about the task of replacing it. I spent a lot of time cleaning the engine bay of dried coolant and taking photographs; I'd say normally this job would require about 2-3 hours for the moderate do-it-yourselfer.

    As with just about any job that is engine-related with our cars, remove the plastic belly-pan by removing the eight bolts that hold it to the car via 8mm socket and 1/4" ratchet. The first REAL step of the job, is then to remove the front cover from the engine. You can see some coolant had actually sprayed on the underside of this as well !! It's also a good time to remove the foam air tubes too.
    IMG_2766.JPG IMG_2767.JPG IMG_2768.jpg


    The next step is to remove the upper radiator fan shroud and to loosen the lower half of the fan shroud. The lower half is not required to be removed from the car; it can be moved aside as needed. The upper part of the fan shroud attaches via two metal spring-clips, and then to the lower half with three 10mm bolts, which can easily be removed with a 10mm socket on a 1/4" ratchet.
    IMG_2769.jpg IMG_2770.JPG


    Just for giggles, and while I was "down there" -- I decided to take a quick peek inside of the power steering reservoir to ensure that my recent tandem pump rebuild project was holding up, and PS fluid was not leaking from the reservoir or pump. I am happy to say that things are just fine.
    IMG_2771.JPG IMG_2823.JPG


    Next up continues with the removal of the three bolts holding the two halves of the plastic fan shroud together.
    IMG_2772.JPG IMG_2773.jpg IMG_2774.jpg


    Then, carefully separate the two halves of the shroud, and lift the top half out from the engine compartment. Look how much dried coolant is on that piece !!
    IMG_2775.JPG IMG_2776.JPG


    A quick check of the decal at the top of the Behr radiator indicates that it is the original unit as installed on the car. I can't complain that it lasted 120,000 miles....
    IMG_2777.JPG


    Next up, we start getting into the hose removal phase from the radiator. There are three coolant hoses to remove, and two transmission fluid lines on the passenger side. The coolant lines are the small top line to the overflow tank; the main top hose leading to the water pump, and the large bottom coolant hoses. All three of the coolant hoses are held on by ring clamps; the two transmission fluid lines are connected by banjo bolts and copper washers. These washers should be renewed upon installation of the new radiator.

    First up, removing the small overflow hose. Notice that I leaned it up against the hood of the car so it would be out of the way, and any coolant inside would drain back down into the overflow tank.
    IMG_2778.JPG IMG_2779.JPG IMG_2780.jpg


    Next up, it's time to drain the radiator using the built-in pet-cock on the bottom of the radiator, passenger side, behind the bumper. My car had a short length of rubber hose already installed onto the outlet, making draining a simple matter of pointing the end of the hose to my drain pan. Although the coolant looks like the green stuff, please rest assured that it is the proper MB coolant (old/yellow style). Remember, I had just added 5+ quarts of the MB stuff into the cooling system just before I left for Europe...
    IMG_2781.jpg IMG_2782.jpg IMG_2783.jpg IMG_2784.jpg


    It's probably not a bad idea to loosen the overflow tank cap to ensure there is no vacuum in the system...
    IMG_2785.jpg


    Next up, it's time to remove the two nuts that hold the transmission coolant line to the bottom of the radiator. These brackets basically just hold the line in place, but have to be removed. A 10mm socket, and moving the bottom part of the fan shroud out of the way, makes fairly short work of these two nuts. Be sure to set them aside in a safe place.
    IMG_2786.JPG


    Next up, it's the banjo bolts that connect the transmission lines to the transmission oil cooler. Have a pan ready (a different one than your coolant pan) to catch the transmission fluid that will drain when you loosen the banjo bolts -- particularly the bottom one. Note that 1/2-1 cup of transmission fluid will leak out.
    IMG_2787.JPG


    Next up is the large upper radiator hose. Good time to inspect these hoses and order new ones if need be... I bent the large upper hose up and stuck it behind the cap of the power steering pump reservoir, which held it very nicely.
    IMG_2788.JPG IMG_2789.JPG


    Do the same with the lower hose (loosen clamp and remove hose).

    Then, remove the two metal spring clamps that hold the radiator to the core support. Note that the clamps clamp down on rubber pads that are attached to the radiator. You will need to remove these rubber pads and transfer them to the new radiator.
    IMG_2790.JPG IMG_2791.jpg IMG_2792.JPG IMG_2793.JPG


    Next you will need to CAREFULLY lift the radiator out of the car. You will need to wiggle it and jigger it to get it out, but it will come out in a couple of minutes, with patience. Take special care to have the lower radiator hose neck and the flange for the transmission cooler line holding clamps clear the fan clutch. Also, BE CAREFUL so as not to damage the A/C condenser coils that are right in front of the radiator.

    Here you see a couple of views of the old and new radiator, immediately after removal. Note that some transmission fluid and coolant will continue to run out of the old radiator, so take caution with regard to spills.
    IMG_2794.JPG IMG_2795.JPG IMG_2796.JPG IMG_2797.JPG IMG_2798.JPG IMG_2799.jpg


    Next up is an inspection of the radiator area. See all of the crud that attaches to the bottom of the radiator and condenser area over the years, and UNDERNEATH the radiator? You should all of this ick out at this time. You can sweep most of it away with your hand. Also, you will want to retrieve the two rubber feet that mate into the lower radiator support, and insert them in the holes there. That way it is very easy to align the new radiator's feet into these rubber feet. I cleaned up my feet with a shot of brake cleaner.
    IMG_2800.JPG IMG_2806.JPG IMG_2801.JPG IMG_2802.JPG IMG_2805.JPG

    Also you can see me removing the rubber bits from the old radiator and preparing to transfer them to the new unit - the mounting clip sleeves, and the short length of drain hose at the pet-cock.
    IMG_2803.jpg *IMG_2807.jpg IMG_2808.jpg IMG_2809.JPG IMG_2810.JPG

    Next up, for me, came a small complication. Although the Nissens radiator was nearly identical to the stock Behr in almost all ways, it did not include the riveted angle brackets on the bottom of the radiator, that serve as supports for the transmission cooler line. This, I had to drill out the rivets and obtain the angle brackets, and then create a new setup with small machine screws. This was about a 30-minute diversion to drill out the rivets and source bolts, nuts and washers for the make-do setup.
    IMG_2811.JPG IMG_2812.JPG


    Dropping the radiator into the engine compartment ... CAREFULLY !!!
    IMG_2813.JPG IMG_2814.JPG


    Next it's time to secure the radiator to the core support by inserting the spring clips and making sure the bottom of the radiator are inserted into the rubber feet cups.
    IMG_2815.JPG IMG_2816.JPG


    The next step is to remove the plastic shipping plugs from the transmission cooler banjo bolt connections, and insert and tighten the banjo bolts attached to the transmission fluid lines. Be sure to use new copper washers at these connections!! Tightening torque is 30 Nm ... so pretty tight. These banjo bolts use a 19mm wrench, so use a long one that gives you some leverage before torquing it down with a socket and torque wrench.
    IMG_2817.jpg IMG_2818.JPG IMG_2821.jpg


    Then, after you have attached the transmission oil lines with the banjo bolts, you can attach them to the angled "holder" brackets at the bottom of the radiator. These are the brackets that I attached earlier with the nuts and bolts after having to drill out the rivets that attached the angle brackets to the original radiator.
    IMG_2819.jpg IMG_2820.jpg


    Then continue re-attaching the coolant hoses. This photo illustrates re-attaching the overflow tank hose to the fitting on the top of the radiator. You can also see me attaching the cleaned-up length of drain hoses to the outlet nipple at the pet-cock, which will make it very easy the next time I want to drain the radiator. You can also see me re-attaching the large upper radiator hose. Be sure to also attach the large lower hose at the bottom of the radiator (not shown here).
    IMG_2822.JPG IMG_2824.JPG IMG_2825.JPG IMG_2829.JPG


    Lastly, insert the two metal spring clips that hold the top half of the plastic radiator fan shroud to the core support, AFTER using the three bolts to mate the two halves of the fan shroud together. Do note that the lower part of the fan shroud fits into two elongated slots in the lower core support, so be sure that these tabs on the lower half of the fan shroud are inserted into these slots before tightening things up.
    IMG_2827.JPG IMG_2828.jpg


    After everything is done, you need to re-add coolant and transmission fluid into the system. What I did was to remove the large upper radiator hose at the water pump (engine side) and pour a fresh mixture of Zerex G05 coolant and water (50-50 mix) into the end of the hose, so that it flowed down into the radiator. It took about a gallon this way. Next I re-attached this hose and then poured about another two quarts or so into the coolant overflow reservoir, bringing it up to the line. Then I started the engine and brought it up to operating temperature at idle, running the cabin heater at full heat and fan to circulate the coolant.

    For the transmission fluid, you should bring the car up to operating temperate at ldle as mentioned above. Once it's hot, get in the car and run it once or twice through the gears: Park, Reverse, Neutral, Drive...and do it once or twice more while sitting in the garage with your foot on the brake. Put the transmission back in Park. Let it idle for a minute or two and then remove the transmission dipstick to check the fluid level. Use ONLY a piece of leather or a lint-free cloth to wipe off the transmission dipstick. Check the fluid level and add fluid accordingly, to bring it up to the proper level. Draining the transmission oil cooler should have probably drained about 1/4 to 1/2 a quart, so it shouldn't require much transmission fluid to bring it back up to the proper level.


    After everything is done, start up the engine to check for leaks. Pay close attention to the banjo bolt fittings at the transmission cooler lines, as well as (of course) the coolant hose connections. If you have any leaks, tighten and/or adjust the connections accordingly. This is what everything should look like once completed.

    Don't forget to also replace the plastic belly pan once the job is complete, and you are sure there are no leaks.
    IMG_2830.JPG

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    Twilling (4 Weeks Ago)

  3. #2
    E500E Guru emerydc8's Avatar
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Thanks for the writeup, Gerry. I'm glad you made it home without overheating. Those stoplights feel like an eternity when you are overheating. I can also relate to getting home from the other side of the planet and jumping right into Mercedes repair. I'm still on Hong Kong time --- probably will be for about a week.
    Jon D.
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    I would like to add to Gerry write up to replace this hose (attached pic) and clamps if it is original factory.

    Because of the heat rubber gets firm and the hose basically cracks at the point of clamps.

    After I replaced my radiator pretty soon this hose cracked , I am glad my 500E is smart vehicle and did it right at my garage.

    It is easy preventive repair which may be real issue if it happens in a trip .

    You will need a hose and two MBZ's clamps.

    Hose is appx $46 and clamps about $3-5 depends where buy parts.



    P.S. My old factory hose had spring inside or something but the new one I got from dealer was just a hose.
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    As an FYI -- both yesterday and today were 93-95F days here in Houston.

    The new radiator has not affected (i.e. reduced) operating temps, which have hovered around 95C in normal driving and 100-102C at stop lights.

    Cheers,
    Gerry

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by Roma_500E View Post
    P.S. My old factory hose had spring inside or something but the new one I got from dealer was just a hose.
    The lower radiator hose has a metal "spring" inside to keep it from collapsing under suction from the water pump.

    The upper radiator hose does not have a spring inside from the factory, and does not need one.


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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Just an update on this today.

    I drove from my home in The Woodlands up to College Station/Bryan, TX to visit our member "Jackasic" who owns Feind Motorsports. The weather varied from 91-97F (32.7-36.1C) external temperatures with average being 93-94F (33.9-34.5C) or each leg of the 71-mile (115 km) trip.

    I had the air-conditioning running during the entire trip. Speeds were anywhere from 65-100 MPH (105-161 km/hr), mostly on back roads although with about 25 miles on TX-6 between Navasota and Bryan, TX on the trip there.

    Temperatures as indicated on the car's gauge generally ran from 95-97C through 105C. I definitely noticed higher temperatures (100-105C) indicated when speeds were above 80 MPH (128.8 km/hr) and when the car was navigating rolling hills (going up hills etc.). At stop lights temperates generally lowered back down to an indicated 95-97C .. just below the 100C hash mark on the gauge.

    Generally speaking, I am observing significantly higher operating temperatures when external temps are above 85F (29.5C), and when high speeds of 80-100 MPH (128.8-161 km/hr) are run over time. At more moderate ambient temperatures of around 70-80F (21-27C) the car runs much cooler whether air conditioning is used or not.

    I am not seeing any appreciable temperature reduction from the new Nissens radiator from the previous OE Behr unit.

    The attached map shows my route "home" from Feind Motorsports on the FM (Farm-to-Market) roads of central Texas. Some wonderful twisty bits on a late Sunday afternoon drive, high speed sweepers and nice speeds (65-70 MPH marked).

    The only hazard I encountered was a 12+ inch long turtle, who was starting to cross the road on my right. From a distance he looked like a piece of tire rubber on the edge of the road, but I saw him and swerved over the to the left (center line) to avoid him. Spotting me, he turned back quickly and reversed direction back to the safety of the edge of the road as I passed. I was surprised at how quickly he moved - I thought turtles were pretty slow. Plenty of true roadkill, including 3-4 squashed armadillos and one (stinky) flattened skunk along the route.

    Cheers,
    Gerry
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    I always keep track of my temperature while I am driving. It is actually a sort of hobby with this car. I ve noticed newer cars are not so sensitive to changes in temperature at least gauge does not vary like on old cars.

    I found exactly the same as Gerry mentioned in his post.

    It also seems that 500E does not like temperature 105+.

    This year summer in MN is kinda weird .
    We had up to 110F couple of weeks ago.
    Last 4 days it is 52F in the early morning ! The only thing who likes these chilly mornings is 500E.
    At this temperature vehicle works amazing.

    At 52F (appx. 12C) and 55 MPH gently cruising on highways I got slightly above 80 bar but almost 80.

    Today night at 62 F and 55/60 MPH gently cruising on highway I got litte bit above 80 I guess 85F ?

    Anyway car drives very nice within 50-70F range, engine works like swiss watches.
    500E 1 of 15

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by Roma_500E View Post
    It also seems that 500E does not like temperature 105+.
    I have always contended this, as well. The M119 as installed in the 124 chassis DOES NOT like hot temperatures (coolant, ambient or inside the engine compartment). I have been told this is nonsense by other knowledgeable folks here, but I continue to believe it (don't tell anyone I said that).

    There is a HUGE difference between a 500E running in cold temperatures and hot temperatures. I have run mine in both, including at the drag strip. My rule of thumb is that each 10-15F drop in ambient temperature, roughly translates to a 0.1 reduction in 1/4 mile time. I recorded my best times with a stock motor, in Portland, at the end of October when the outside temperature was just a couple of degrees above freezing.

    The only thing I will say is that I don't seem to get the occasional hiccups at idle (that many of us experience) nearly to the extent that I did when I lived in a colder climate.

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Cooler temps = nature's natural super/turbo charger. Engines love cooler weather!

    " I was surprised at how quickly he moved - I thought turtles were pretty slow."

    That is what most people say when they look at our cars.
    Trae
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Isn't this also why, THEY say, you should dyno at 60c engine temp ?

    And maybe the "cool harness" mod ain't such a bad idea, and as claimed by Jim Forgione "Since the engine runs cooler, you'll have more usable horsepower available, so it's a good investment for your MB.






    Or is this debatable and that cooler ambient temperature is what counts , not warm air from fans blasting into the engine bay ??
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    I don't know about all that. I don't treat Jim F's stuff as gospel either, though some of it is pretty good.

    What I do know is that I have been told that my theory of a 0.1 second drop in 1/4 mile time for each 10-15F degree drop in ambient temperature is nonsense. But I don't believe it, because my experience in drag racing in a wide variety of ambient temps has borne this out. And that includes not only my E500, but my 560SEC, my former 450SEL 6.9, and my former 300SEL 6.3.

    I used to put dry ice on my 6.3 and E500's intake tubes/airbox (respectively) between drag races, and this also helped, particularly on the highly exposed 6.3 intake tubes.

    Just sayin....

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Any engine will produce better at lower temps. From turbine to recip, they all perform better with colder, (more dense) air!
    Trae
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by Trae View Post

    " I was surprised at how quickly he moved - I thought turtles were pretty slow."

    That is what most people say when they look at our cars.


    Quote Originally Posted by gerryvz View Post
    I have always contended this, as well. The M119 as installed in the 124 chassis DOES NOT like hot temperatures (coolant, ambient or inside the engine compartment). I have been told this is nonsense by other knowledgeable folks here, but I continue to believe it (don't tell anyone I said that).

    There is a HUGE difference between a 500E running in cold temperatures and hot temperatures. I have run mine in both, including at the drag strip. My rule of thumb is that each 10-15F drop in ambient temperature, roughly translates to a 0.1 reduction in 1/4 mile time. I recorded my best times with a stock motor, in Portland, at the end of October when the outside temperature was just a couple of degrees above freezing.
    I did not take my 500E on a track but what I ve noticed for sure is that at 40F-50F car is very responsive on gas pedal and it goes nimbly. While at 85F+ you can tell right away car does not want you to drive fast.

    I also think that key point here is ambient fresh air. The cold wire harness is just somehow helpful.

    So I think you theory (-0.1 on time) could be true basically because of the better performance.

    Supercharger hates hot weather. Between hot ambient air+hot supercharger and cold weather 40-50F and relatively cold supercharges is like 20% difference in performance. (at least what I ve noticed on MB and car has bigger separate intercooler)

    Quote Originally Posted by Trae View Post
    Any engine will produce better at lower temps. From turbine to recip, they all perform better with colder, (more dense) air!
    Very true but 500E appears to be little more sensitive to hot environment than other vehicle.
    500E 1 of 15

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Ambient air temp is only one of MANY different weather factors which affect performance. This is why a car may be faster on a 90°F day with very low humidity and high barometric pressure, while the same car may run the same time (or slower!) on a 60°F day with high humidity and low barometric pressure, despite the 30F reduction in temperature, which is supposed to make the car three tenths quicker.

    National Dragster recently had an article on this topic, see attached PDF. Note the conspicuous absence of ambient temperature as a major factor.

    Lower ambient temps can improve performance to varying degrees, but this is not a hard and fast rule, and the effect is often much less than many people would expect. I've personally found that barometric pressure has more effect on ET's than ambient temps in my 500E's, but I only have about a thousand runs of data in several cars over ten years. Some folks may have noticed their car always ran quicker in cold ambients and slower in warm ambeints, but unless they ALSO were capturing the barometric pressure, humidity, wind speed/direction, and other factors... the performance change cannot be attributed to air temp alone.


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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by Trae View Post
    Any engine will produce better at lower temps.
    The M119 seems to produce about the same power with engine temps anywhere from approx 60-85C, maybe 60-90C. When engine temp gets to 95C+ power can drop slightly, and north of 100C the computers start to fiddle with timing & whatnot. For most practical purposes this is mostly irrelevant, it only really matters for racing or dyno numbers. The factory docs say that on the dyno, the CTS should be set at 80C, and IAT set at 20C, using special tools (fixed resistors) in place of the sensors.


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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Just because a magazine article doesn't list ambient/intake air temp as a factor, doesn't mean it isn't. As has been said, our M119 engines seem especially sensitive to IAT.

    What is the purpose of letting an engine cool down in between drag races? What is the purpose of blowing a big-a$$ fan into the radiator during a dyno pull?

    In addition to icing the intake, my cooldown technique was always to drop the windows, and run the ACC at High Heat and fan HI for a good 30 minutes (car running on battery) in between races to try to evacuate heat from the coolant and help cool down the engine. We would also run an electric fan (and occasionally, not having such, a leaf blower) into the engine compartment from the front (similar to a dyno setup) to try to cool down the engine compartment faster -- with the hood up, of course.

    In Portland, where I did all of my drag racing, humidity and barometric pressure never vary beyond reasonable limits (unlike here in Houston). Temperature, in Portland, was ALWAYS the biggest factor.

    I would venture to say, as well, that whether it be drag races or dyno pulls ... my races with the coolest engine and always my first dyno pulls were the strongest where the most HP was generated. Secondary and tertiary dyno pulls ALWAYS generated less power and torque on my E500. And when drag racing, over the course of a 4-5 hour stint at the drag strip, when temps would vary by 20-30 degrees as nighttime fell in the fall season, my dyno slips also showed corresponding decreases in times as IAT decreased.

    The barometric pressure, windspeed, wind shear, and humidity wouldn't vary hugely (as temperature DID) over the course of a few hours at the drag strip, so they can generally be eliminated as substantial, contributing factors for a single night's series of drag races. When comparing different dates, with different weather, certainly these factors should be examined.

    I guess next time I go drag racing, here in Houston, I'll need to hire a miniature weather station in a trailer to bring along as an entourage so that I can record exact weather conditions to ensure evenness of data sampling. I'd say that 5-minute increments would be appropriate for measuring all pertinent weather conditions. But I'd also instruct them NOT to worry about ambient temperatures, becuase National Dragster didn't list ambient temp/IAT as a contributing factor to drag race performance.

    I wonder if National Dragster knows anything about M119 sensitivity to ambient/IATs? Nope, probably not.

    Cheers,
    Gerry

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Yep, humidity is the key. I can immediately tell how the car is performing in humid weather.

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    As I mentioned previously, I agree that air temp does affect performance and it is a factor... but I disagree that it's a major factor, or that it can cause significant differences in performance at the dragstrip.

    The purpose of letting an engine cool down in between drag races (specifically, bracket racing) is to get the engine, transmission, oil, and coolant temps back to what they were at the start of the previous run, for consistency. This has nothing to do with ambient temps, if you hot lap, the car may slow a tenth or more, even with the same ambient temp.

    On the dyno, the most power is usually the first or second pull, depending on how warm the engine was to begin with... if it was too cool, the first pull may not make the most power. Usually, the third consecutive pull (back to back) will be slightly lower.

    You would be surprised how much the pressure and humidity vary over 4-6 hours at the track. I document all this data with each run, from a Kestrel portable weather station, to get real-time data at the track itself, not from an airport which could be miles away.



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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by gsxr View Post
    You would be surprised how much the pressure and humidity vary over 4-6 hours at the track. I document all this data with each run, from a Kestrel portable weather station, to get real-time data at the track itself, not from an airport which could be miles away.
    Ideally, it would be best to have 3-4 Kestrels stationed at the Christmas Tree, midway along the strip, at the end of the strip and then perhaps in the pit/cool off area so that all micro-climates are recorded while at the track. Have you considered doing that?

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by gerryvz View Post
    Ideally, it would be best to have 3-4 Kestrels stationed at the Christmas Tree, midway along the strip, at the end of the strip and then perhaps in the pit/cool off area so that all micro-climates are recorded while at the track. Have you considered doing that?
    Sarcasm/joking aside, you would be amazed at the difference that can occur at the starting line compared to the finish line, particularly in wind direction and wind speed. When you are agonizing over one or two hundredths of a second (0.01-0.02 second) on your dial-in, a 5mph wind difference can translate into winning vs losing. I lost several races this year due to this.

    OK, I checked my records, this year alone I've lost 11 different races by LESS than 0.02 seconds. This past Saturday night my loss margin was 0.0101 (that's 101 ten-thousandths of a second, or roughly a fraction of a hummingbird wingbeat longer than one-hundredth).



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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    The kind of racing you are doing (where consistency to your prediction is paramount) is a bit different than the "lowest time at all costs" type of street-drags that I did on the "Friday and Saturday Night Fights" at PIR though. So the factors you pay attention to are different, because your end goal/game is different.

    Cheers,
    Gerry

    Do they sell Kestrel weather stations via Amazon.com? Are they NWS-approved?
    kestrel1.jpgkestrel1.jpgkestrel1.jpg

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    True. But I also spent a couple of years playing the "lowest time at all costs" game. Lower ambient temps didn't boost performance noticeably, i.e. waiting later in the evening as temps dropped did not make the car pick up a tenth. The best thing is to remove all excess weight, go on a day with high pressure and relatively low humidity, aim for engine temp around 70C, and pray for a tailwind.


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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by bing View Post
    Or is this debatable and that cooler ambient temperature is what counts
    Didn't really mean to , honest! I got headache now

    @Ron500E, can u chime in , please!
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Here is a photo taken just a few minutes ago, driving home from work. 100F (indicated) outside temp ... give or take 3 degrees or so.

    Pretty normal to what I see when the temp outside is high.

    2013-07-29 17.33.50.jpg

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Wait a minute...engine temperature at 100C is normal while driving in hot weather? If that's the case, then my whip is running cooler in hot weather while in motion. Attached pic is from two weeks ago on the way to the Willow Springs track event, AC on and 99F outside temperature.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by gerryvz View Post
    Just an update on this today.

    Generally speaking, I am observing significantly higher operating temperatures when external temps are above 85F (29.5C), and when high speeds of 80-100 MPH (128.8-161 km/hr) are run over time. At more moderate ambient temperatures of around 70-80F (21-27C) the car runs much cooler whether air conditioning is used or not.
    Similar findings. I just completed a round trip to Napa Valley from so cal, going up the 5 freeway. Between Grapevine and the 580, ambient temps ranged from 101F to 110F. In these cases, with AC going full blast, a recent new $$$$$ fan clutch, etc, the gauge showed above the 100C mark. Most of the trip is flat, but on occasion, some minor hills presented themselves.

    When going through the Tejon pass between LA and the grapevine, I didn't take any changes and drove with the heat on full blast and windows rolled down - the steep grade, higher ambient temps (85-95F), and altitude contributed to temps well over that 100C marker. That part was miserable

    On another note, when on earth did it become normal to pass on the right?!
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by szvook View Post
    Wait a minute...engine temperature at 100C is normal while driving in hot weather? If that's the case, then my whip is running cooler in hot weather while in motion. Attached pic is from two weeks ago on the way to the Willow Springs track event, AC on and 99F outside temperature.
    That is really awesome, good for you! Did you get much variation? That route along the 14 has some steep hills, so, going up, my car would likely break 100, and going downhills get to your level.
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    I've seen a pretty wide variance in M119 5.0L operating temps. I've still not determined a root cause, although with AC on and engine temp at or above 100C in ambients above 95F, the mechanical fan clutch should be engaged and roar (i.e., remain engaged) when you rev to 3000rpm in park/neutral. If it's disengaging by 1500-2000, something's amiss, likely either the clutch, OR restricted airflow in front of the clutch center, OR a 'cold spot' in the radiator in front of the clutch. Other possibilities are sensors on the wrong side of tolerance, ditto for thermostats, maybe a cooling system not holding pressure as it should, or a number of other things.

    At any rate, in brutal temps (100-110F, AC on max) I too have seen engine temps at 100-105C, and I'm ok with that. I know, I know, it's crazy... I'm actually agreeing with Gerry. Ron, please alert the media; I'll be prepared for the paparazzi to swarm my shop tomorrow AM.

    For the record: I would get nervous at 110C, and I would put the heater on max at 115C, but I've not yet experienced any of those temps - yet.



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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by szvook View Post
    Wait a minute...engine temperature at 100C is normal while driving in hot weather? If that's the case, then my whip is running cooler in hot weather while in motion. Attached pic is from two weeks ago on the way to the Willow Springs track event, AC on and 99F outside temperature.
    I think the humidity and barometric pressure of Texas have something to do with it. At least that's what American Dragster says. Temps mean nothing.

    By the way I'm comfortable with that 100C indicated when the AC is on max and the outside temp is 100F. If I didn't have the AC on that temp would have been around 96-98C, just below the line.

    If the outside temp was 80-85F, the needle would have been sitting right on 90C with AC on max.

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by gerryvz View Post
    Here is a photo taken just a few minutes ago, driving home from work. 100F (indicated) outside temp ... give or take 3 degrees or so.

    Pretty normal to what I see when the temp outside is high.

    2013-07-29 17.33.50.jpg
    Never got that high temperature while in a motion at any temperature outside (up to 110F). Usually what I got is similar to Steve or little higher if I drive it fast.
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by gerryvz View Post
    I think the humidity and barometric pressure of Texas have something to do with it. At least that's what American Dragster says.
    NATIONAL Dragster! Sheesh!


    Quote Originally Posted by gerryvz View Post
    Temps mean nothing.
    If you actually read the article, they do mention ambient temp, but primarily as a factor of density altitude, where - as I beat the horse deader - temp is only one small factor.



    Quote Originally Posted by gerryvz View Post
    By the way I'm comfortable with that 100C indicated when the AC is on max and the outside temp is 100F.
    Me too. I smell a group hug coming on. C'mon, everyone gather round...




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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by jano View Post
    Did you get much variation? That route along the 14 has some steep hills.
    The most I've seen was prolly 90-91F, otherwise my auxiliary fans would have triggered, since I'm using the Cool Harness set to trigger the fans at 92C. I have yet to trigger the auxiliary fans while driving the car under any weather conditions and against most road grades in SoCal, stuck in traffic for a long time is another story.

    Side note - JimF will only make the CH-92 models nowadays, so I've asked him to make me a CH-98 as a favor. I figure I'll have the low and the high temperature triggers to choose from, incase I get tired of the CH-92.

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Real 036 men live on the edge and drive with an indicated 100-110C....

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by gerryvz View Post
    I think the humidity and barometric pressure of Texas have something to do with it. At least that's what American Dragster says. Temps mean nothing.

    By the way I'm comfortable with that 100C indicated when the AC is on max and the outside temp is 100F. If I didn't have the AC on that temp would have been around 96-98C, just below the line.

    If the outside temp was 80-85F, the needle would have been sitting right on 90C with AC on max.
    I agree, the humidity was the factor. On the way to the track, the humidity was around 35%. My AC was set to Auto.

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Aum...Aum...Aum
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by gerryvz View Post
    Real 036 men live on the edge and drive with an indicated 100-110C....
    Speak of which, where is Jelmer?

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Great thread. Changed my original radiator today on the '93 using Gerry's step-by-step instrux. Pretty fun job, about 2 hours. Waiting for my MB fluid to arrive so I can finish up. Got a BEHR radiator from Arizona Autohaus, fit perfectly with no bracket mods necessary.

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Following the instructions in this thread to replace my radiator, however, ran into a snag. After removing 1 of 3 bolts holding fan shroud together, the two bolts on drivers side appear to be spinning in place when I attempt to remove them. Any tips for a neophyte as to how to remove these bolts? I can feel the back of the bottom of the bolt spin in place without backing out. Thanks

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by vatc5637 View Post
    Following the instructions in this thread to replace my radiator, however, ran into a snag. After removing 1 of 3 bolts holding fan shroud together, the two bolts on drivers side appear to be spinning in place when I attempt to remove them. Any tips for a neophyte as to how to remove these bolts? I can feel the back of the bottom of the bolt spin in place without backing out. Thanks
    Yeah, that is a common problem. Usually you'll need to unhook the bottom of the shroud from the radiator, then remove the ATF hoses from the radiator, and pull the radiator out while leaving the fan/clutch/shroud in place. Once the radiator is removed, you can pull the shroud out in one piece, and see if you can get the little M6 bolts unfrozen.

    If you can get it apart intact, apply anti-seize to all three M6 bolts and DO NOT over-tighten them. Worst case, you'll need to buy a new lower shroud, and use anti-seize on the new one to prevent the same problem in the future.

    On most 400E/500E you can remove the factory Sachs clutch+fan with special tools, with the radiator in place. On some cars, due to tolerance stack or front-end impacts, there may not be adequate room between the clutch & radiator face, the radiator must come out first (unless it has an aftermarket ACM/Vemo/etc clutch).

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Gerry- actually, those washers are NOT suppose to be copper, but Aluminum washers. At least, that is what has been on both my cars...



    Michael

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by samiam44 View Post
    Gerry- actually, those washers are NOT suppose to be copper, but Aluminum washers. At least, that is what has been on both my cars...
    The washers at the transmission are aluminum. The washers at the radiator are copper. That's what is specified in the EPC and it's usually what I find on my cars, but you never know what a previous mechanic might have put in there.



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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    On the washers you should minimize galvanic corrosion. Yes, AL makes sense against the trans case. At the radiator, it depends on the threads in the radiator if they are AL or Brass... Lucky I've got some extra copper washers.

    Michael
    Last edited by samiam44; 12-17-2013 at 07:45 PM.

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Copper was what was on my original radiator so it is what I stayed with.

    With regard to the bolt spinning ... IIRC I had one that spun. I decided to just break off the lower portion and I ordered a new one, and tightened it more carefully. I don't know the last time when the shroud had been removed, but it wasn't me who did it.... I could have kept the broken shroud (with one bolt on each side) but the replacement wasn't super expensive. I also got a larger nut/bolt at the hardware store to help prevent the situation repeating.

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by gsxr View Post
    Yeah, that is a common problem. Usually you'll need to unhook the bottom of the shroud from the radiator, then remove the ATF hoses from the radiator, and pull the radiator out while leaving the fan/clutch/shroud in place. Once the radiator is removed, you can pull the shroud out in one piece, and see if you can get the little M6 bolts unfrozen.

    If you can get it apart intact, apply anti-seize to all three M6 bolts and DO NOT over-tighten them. Worst case, you'll need to buy a new lower shroud, and use anti-seize on the new one to prevent the same problem in the future.
    Thanks guys for your input. I ended up doing exactly as Dave suggested. The good news is that the radiator and fan shroud (can't undo bolts, will need to get a new lower shroud) are both out cleanly (no further damage to a/c condenser or any other expensive part. Bad news is: 1) radiator took a clean shot (as a result from hitting a deer) from the fan blades resulting in a 1" gash and is unsalvageable; and 2) with the radiator out, I can now clearly see all my other issues, such as new caps and rotors needed, cam solenoid, p/s pump and hose leak, transmission fluid leaks, leaks around the valve cover gasket, etc. At this rate I'm afraid to remove anything else . . . Looks like the .034 is in for an extended stay in the garage while I try to figure out how to sort it all out.

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Most of what you're saying is eminently and fairly easily fixable. For the cam solenoid, I just the other day posted that I will let my cam solenoid special sealant go cheaply, and folks can pass it on to others as they need to do this job. Valve cover gasket isn't a big deal, just have to take care in doing it, and it's discussed on other threads. transmission fluid leaks ... if it's at the lines/radiator these are fairly cheaply available. A new Nissens radiator is around $200 from AHAZ. PS pump leak is most likely the short hose. It's accessible once you remove the reservoir. It's documented in another thread. Caps and rotors are very well documented. Now that your radiator is coming out, it's a perfect time to refresh all this stuff while you can get to it. Fan clutch and radiator hoses, too.

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by gerryvz View Post
    . . . For the cam solenoid, I just the other day posted that I will let my cam solenoid special sealant go cheaply, and folks can pass it on to others as they need to do this job. . . .
    I did see your post and had responded . . . hopefully I am at or near the front of that particular line . . . As for the rest, you are probably right, all eminently doable, I think that I was reacting more to the multiplicity of needs. I'm actually pretty amazed that I managed to get this far on my own. As many others have said, the info available here is invaluable, when I read what you and others have done, it makes me believe that I can also pull some of these jobs off. Then cold, hard reality kicks in once I get started but by then its too late to stop, so onward.

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Honestly, the ONLY way to move forward is to venture out into the unknown. You have to get out of your comfort zone and it's only THEN that you learn. If you don't push yourself, take a leap off that figurative high diving board, you'll never know. Trust me, I was completely out of my comfort zone when it came to doing my M117 top-end rebuild almost 4 years ago. Was completely scared $pitless. I did not know what to expect. But when I finished that job, and worked out the kinks (i.e. vacuum leaks), the sense of self-accomplishment was really supreme. It inspired me to do more jobs, large and small. Several of the folks here on this site inspire me too with their projects. Same with my current M104 rebuild, though it's a bit easier this time around, it has had its own challenges (the cam bearing caps only being ONE of the several challenges I've had on that job). The best way to do this stuff is to plan it out well in advance, do your research, order the parts you KNOW you'll need.

    The best thing is that problems can be solved. All car problems are eminently solve-able. There are three pieces of advice I'd give. 1) Be persistent. Never give up when you face a problem. Get others' perspective because it's likely someone here has faced the problem before (i.e. the radiator shroud) and has probably solved it. 2) Don't be in a hurry. Expect that a job will take triple the time you think it will, because if it's the first time you're doing it, or you don't have the special tools to do it, it probably will. Errors often get introduced when you get into a rush. And 3) Don't cut corners. Do things right, because if you don't, things will usually bite you in the end. Things like re-using parts that really should be replaced. Just replace them.

    If you get in over your head, there are TONS of folks here who can and will pitch in with advice, photos, and perspective on how to overcome the issue. The knowledge here about these cars is really second to none, and I have never seen better on a forum ... even other specialist forums like the M-100 Group that I used to belong to.

    So yes ... onward & upward !!

  49. #48
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by gsxr View Post
    The washers at the transmission are aluminum. The washers at the radiator are copper. That's what is specified in the EPC and it's usually what I find on my cars, but you never know what a previous mechanic might have put in there.
    Yes, mine are copper at the radiator as well, aluminum at the transmission.

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    OK, a little searching on the EPC and I found that:

    Water pump, same number.

    Fan clutch, same number.

    Front subframe, same number.

    Radiator, different numbers.

    034 = 124-500-14 02
    036 = 124-500-03 02

    124-500-03 02 applies to both 034 & 036 on a part# search however,

    124-500-14 02 only applies to 034 and the 03 02 supersedes to 14 02 only on the 034.

    That has to be the difference. My car has a 03-1993 build date so that must be when they
    changed the part#, or my radiator was replaced at some point.

  51. #50
    I do believe...! Christian_K's Avatar
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Thats interesting... maybe one of the reasons the 4.2L always run cooler and i never saw a E420 with heat issues like the 500 has.

    Just some things to add/correct:
    - Regarding the upper coolant hose. Mine is still the factory one and it has indeed a very strong spring inside.
    - Engine temp around 100°C at 100F would be a little bit to high. However i have found out that the gauges in the instrument clusters all go bad in the W124s over time. That said, as Jelmer and i were doing the Electrical fan conversion to get rid of the clutch system, we noticed that upon hitting the 100°C Mark at the dash, we only had like ~89°C from both front sensors according the the MT2500 digital scanner.
    So, IF your dash would be really showing the actual values, i would replace my water-pump (i'd suspect a great DIY-Topic of yours Gerry) and flush the coolant-system before doing so, with some special cleaner (lemon Acid is not that good on aluminum engines).
    Christian K.
    06/1992 500E - DB199 Blauschwarz-Metallic
    09/1989 300E - DB172 Anthrazitgrau-Metallic
    11/1998 E430 - DB339 Violan-Metallic
    06/2003 CL55 AMG KOMPRESSOR - DB197 Obsidianschwarz-Metallic


  52. #51
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    You have to wonder why the 034 superseded and
    the 036 didn't.



    Sent from my SPH-M930BST using Tapatalk 2

  53. #52
    Senior Member G Man's Avatar
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Glad this "how to" is here. Out to dinner with the family tonight, I noticed my temps were way too high as I pulled into the restaurant parking lot. Upon inspection, the top radiator "neck" had broken off into the upper hose. I had left a coolant trail about an 1/8th of mile down the street. After dinner, I walked down the street to the Auto Zone, and picked up some coolant and a few tools. I was able to get the hose over the remaining inlet, filled with coolant, and limped it back home. New radiator ordered. I guess next Saturday is scheduled. Argh!!

    Gary
    1992 500E- Sold but not forgotten...
    2004 E55
    2001 M5

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    I'm replacing my tensioner pully this weekend.

    I'll show pics of my uber cool factory pully holder.

    Not for sale.

  55. #54
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by G Man View Post
    Glad this "how to" is here. Out to dinner with the family tonight, I noticed my temps were way too high as I pulled into the restaurant parking lot. Upon inspection, the top radiator "neck" had broken off into the upper hose. I had left a coolant trail about an 1/8th of mile down the street. After dinner, I walked down the street to the Auto Zone, and picked up some coolant and a few tools. I was able to get the hose over the remaining inlet, filled with coolant, and limped it back home. New radiator ordered. I guess next Saturday is scheduled. Argh!!
    Hey G-Man,

    Did you order a Nissens or a Behr replacement? Just be prepared for the rivet/bolt issue that I documented with regard to the coolant holders. I went to my neighborhood Ace Hardware to grab new bolts for that, so no biggie. You'll see it immediately. I don't know if the replacement Behrs have the coolant line holder setup already, or not. In any case that was the only real snag on the process. Otherwise, it was pretty straightforward.

    I will tell you I was sh*tting my pants after I discovered my radiator was leaking, because my car got EXTREMELY hot on the 4 miles between I-45 and my house in the middle of The Woodlands. But I made it OK. I'd lost I think about 1/3-1/2 of my total coolant. Hopefully you didn't lose that much. Sorry that you're not local anymore, I'd be over to Cypress to help you & catch up if you were.

    Hope all is doing well with you & the family since your relo. I do get up Plano on occasion for work so will let you know next time I'm up there; also I'm probably due to give Patrick (texas993) and Michael (samiam44) a visit in the spring, so maybe that's a chance to get together.

    Good luck with the install. Be CAREFUL putting the new radiator in so that you don't bend or gow the fins up. And I'd recommend new copper crush washers for the banjo bolts that attach the transmission cooler lines to the radiator. They are the same as for the fuel pumps & fuel filter.

    Cheers,
    Gerry

  56. #55
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by gerryvz View Post
    Good luck with the install. Be CAREFUL putting the new radiator in so that you don't bend or gow the fins up. And I'd recommend new copper crush washers for the banjo bolts that attach the transmission cooler lines to the radiator. They are the same as for the fuel pumps & fuel filter.
    Copper washers for trans cooler hose to radiator should be p/n 007603-014106 (14x20 mm), same as used for the steering box low pressure fitting.

    The fuel pumps & filters use different size copper seals (12x17 mm), p/n 007603-012110.


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  58. #56
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Dave is correct. Trans lines 14mm, fuel pump 12mm

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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Thanks for the correction.

  60. #58
    Senior Member G Man's Avatar
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Gerry
    Do you remember the size of the new bolts you bought from Ace? I'd like to have everything ready before I start the disassembly. I bought the Behr unit. I also ordered new copper washers. I lost right at a gallon of coolant/water yesterday.

    Gary
    1992 500E- Sold but not forgotten...
    2004 E55
    2001 M5

  61. #59
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    I don't, but they were pretty small/stubby. I'll try to pull one this weekend and measure it for you. Just getting started on removing the transmission from my wife's car so things are a bit crazy right now in the ol' garage shop....

  62. #60
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    Re: HOW-TO: Replacing 500E/E500 Radiator

    Thanks. I have at least a week until the radiator arrives.

    Gary
    1992 500E- Sold but not forgotten...
    2004 E55
    2001 M5

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